Natural Pest Control Has Historic Roots

Eco-friendly pest management is not new. In truth it’s really ancient. Early man struggled with insects even before farming.  As soon as farming really started the fight turned into a war. Hundreds and even 1000’s of years in the past, there were not any pesticides to select from. And therefore the earliest farmers were significantly determined. The failing of a single plant may carry the danger of starving.

The ancient farmers had to be really observant and fast to replicate what remedy they saw.  This doesn’t mean that they consistently got it correct, however they tried. A range of eco-friendly pest control strategies are actually pointed out within the writings of ancient China, Greece, Egypt, as well as Rome. Even though a few of these strategies happen to be rooted in religion or superstition, a few had long lasting scientific significance. Those are the ones most people still use today.

Prior to the term Integrated Pest Management was ever thought of, the ancients were discovering Integrated Pest Management procedures like:

Biological Control – making use of beneficial organisms to help you manage bugs

Cultural Controls – using crop rotation and sanitation to eliminate insects

Physical Controls – utilizing baits and traps, and burning up vegetation soon after harvest

Genetic Control Methods – making use of pest resistant vegetation

Quite a few civilizations burned off the remains of a crop right after harvesting in order to eliminate pests, larva and eggs along with weed seeds. This method is noted  noticed from the ancient Chinese close to three thousand years ago and by the Roman Virgil, a thousand years later. Still today quite a few farmers still burn their crop residue though climate change concerns could alter that.

Getting rid of crop residue was just one of several procedures to disrupt the life cycle of insects. Crop rotation is an additional approach initially used in ancient China to keep pest populations from swiftly reproducing. During the sixth century BC, the Greek philosopher and also mathematician Pythagorus was given credit for eradicating malaria in a township as a result of asking citizens to drain the close by swamps.

The Chinese in particular grew to become good at using helpful species to manage bugs. For example 3200 years ago ancient Chinese texts note the usage of predatory ants to shield citrus groves from caterpillars and even wood boring beetles. Afterwards officials banned the removal of eggs and also the hunting of both frogs and birds due to the fact these species eat large numbers of insects. Praying mantises were released in gardens among the chrysanthemums to help eat leaf-eating insects.

The first mechanical bug traps were not designed until the early 1700’s. A German doctor named Franz Bruckmann made fly traps made out of a wooden box. They integrated a spring loaded cover and were baited using a sweet attractant. Bruckmann likewise created flea traps worn round the neck. They grew to become very popular with the aristocracy of Western Europe in those days.

Environmentally friendly pest control methods aren’t new. They have been refined and proved over thousands of years. In most cases these were affordable, easy and risk-free. After decades of using chemical pesticides, the tide started turning back to more organic approaches. These methods tend to be jointly known as Integrated Pest Management, and they’re the future of pest control.

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About John Payton

Bee control expert and founder of a bee control company http://www.beeremovalspecialist.com http://employee-wellness-programs.com
This entry was posted in Home Pest Control, Pest Control and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

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